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TASTER COURSE

How copyright impacts human rights

What’s more important: protecting a company’s copyright or someone’s right to education? If you thought copyright and human rights weren’t interconnected, think again. This course will challenge your legal preconceptions by examining how this connection impacts fundamental issues like access to education and cultural life.

 

About this course

Could Oxford University use human rights to stop an Indian medical student copying part of their textbook? Or is HBO violating fans' human rights when they delay the international release of their latest episode?

Human rights are individuals’ most important rights. They protect rights to access education, free speech and even a right to access the internet. But when it comes to their relationship to copyright new questions emerge.

In this course you will learn that human rights can protect copyright but they also protect a range of other rights, including the right to participate in cultural life and access scientific progress. However, problematically, these rights are not directly addressed in international copyright regimes that most states have agreed to observe. Does this mean that human rights can’t be protected through copyright? Or is it possible for all these rights to coexist? Some might argue we are in the middle of a clash of rights.

Your starting point will be to examine the role of human rights in protecting copyright and education. You will consider justifications for copyright and the limited human rights protection that exists for authors. A key discussion point will be the important decision in the copyright infringement suit brought by major academic publishers against the Rameshwari Photocopy Service and the University of Delhi.

This discussion will allow you to better understand the way in which copyright has a range of different impacts depending on the level of development reached in the country where copyright is protected. This decision also highlights the importance of exceptions to copyright.

You will develop a nuanced understanding with regards to the importance of copyright exceptions in support of the human right to education.

Course Structure 

  • What does copyright protect?
  • Why should we protect copyright? Is it a human right?
  • Why shouldn’t we protect copyright?
  • How can copyright protect the human right to education?

 

Why you should do this course

  • Find out what copyright really protects and why we protect it
  • Get across exceptions to copyright so you can understand what your rights are
  • Think about the importance of access to educational materials to the human right to education and how copyright impacts on this
  • Gain some of the critical knowledge required for the UTS Master of Intellectual Property

Who is this course for?

This course is suited to those looking for a in depth look at copyright and its direct impact on human rights, for example; 

  • Legal professionals
  • Human rights lawyers 
  • Educators 
Free course

START DATE

Start anytime

MODE

Online

DURATION

Self paced

Meet the Expert

Genevieve Wilkinson

Genevieve Wilkinson
Quentin Bryce Teaching Fellow, Faculty of Law

Genevieve has worked as a lawyer for many years in Australia and the United Kingdom for firms including Freehills and Olswang. She has also obtained a European Masters of Human Rights and Democratisation (European Inter-University Center) and a Master of Industrial Property (UTS). Her current research focuses on intersections between intellectual property law and human rights law. She is passionate about finding ways to make copyright assist access to knowledge and education.

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